Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/13270
Title: Characterisation of groundwater dissolved organic matter using LC-OCD: implications for water treatment
Authors: Rutlidge, H
McDonough, LK
Oudone, PP
Andersen, MS
Meredith, KT
Chinu, K
Peterson, MA
Baker, AA
Keywords: Ground water
Organic matter
Water treatment
Aquifers
Carbon
Chromatography
Issue Date: 1-Jan-2021
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Rutlidge, H., McDonough, L. K., Oudone, P., Andersen, M. S., Meredith, K., Chinu, K., Peterson, M., & Baker, A. (2021). Characterisation of groundwater dissolved organic matter using LC-OCD: implications for water treatment. Water Research, 188, 116422. doi:10.1016/j.watres.2020.116422
Abstract: The polarity and molecular weight of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important factor determining the treatability of water for domestic supply. DOM in surface water and groundwater is comprised of a mixture of carbon with varying molecular weight ranges, with its composition driven by DOM sources and processing. Here, we present the largest dataset of chromatographic DOM in surface and groundwater samples (n = 246) using liquid chromatography organic carbon detection (LCsingle bondOCD). Our data represents four categories (surface water, hyporheic zone water, local groundwater, and regional groundwater) from five different sites across Australia. In all environments, high molecular weight hydrophilic DOM such as biopolymers (BP) and humic substances (HS) are present in surface waters and are processed out of groundwater as it moves from surface water and hyporheic zones into shallow local groundwater and deeper regional groundwaters. This results in a higher percentage of low molecular weight neutrals (LMWN) and hydrophobic organic carbon (HOC) in deeper regional groundwaters. Our findings indicate that the presence of sedimentary organic matter strongly influence the character of surface and groundwater DOM, resulting in groundwater with higher HS aromaticity and molecular weight, and reduced percentage of LMWNs. We also observe highly variable hydrophilic / HOC ratios in groundwater at all sites, with 9.60% and 25.64% of samples at sites containing sedimentary peat layers and non-sedimentary peat sites respectively containing only hydrophilic dissolved organic carbon (DOC). We identify average hydrophilic / HOC ratios of 4.35 ± 3.76 and 7.53 ± 5.32 at sites containing sedimentary peat layers and non-sedimentary peat sites respectively where both hydrophilic DOC and HOC are present. Overall our results suggest that fractured rock and alluvial aquifers in sedimentary organic carbon poor environments may contain DOC which is better suited to ozonation, biologically activated carbon filtration powdered activated carbon, suspended ion exchange treatment or magnetic ion exchange resin since DOC is more hydrophilic and of lower molecular weight and lower aromaticity. Aquifers located near sedimentary organic matter layers may benefit from pre-treatment by coagulation/flocculation, sedimentation and sand filtration which have high removal efficiency for high molecular weight and polar compounds. © 2021 Elsevier Ltd.
URI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2020.116422
https://apo.ansto.gov.au/dspace/handle/10238/13270
ISSN: 0043-1354
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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